State attorney won’t prosecute local guides; Tampa area captain’s fate uncertain

Capt. Jim Huddleston

FWC officers pull aside Capt. James Huddleston’s boat on May 15 after observing the Tampa-area guide fishing two illegal “breakaway” bottom-weighted jigs.

While high-profile Professional Tarpon Tournament Series angler and charter captain James W. Huddleston continues to await his day in Lee County Circuit Court, prosecutors are moving ahead with plans to defer and ultimately dismiss all charges against two local fishing guides accused by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officers of allegedly violating rules prohibiting the use of “breakaway” gear in Boca Grande Pass.

Ftafbphoto

The Gang That Couldn’t Shoot Straight came through again. Great timing, guys. They chose yesterday to recycle an old Facebook post and plaster it across the top of their page. We saved it for you here because odds are it’s not going to last long over there.

The decision to halt prosecution came as Capt. Frank E. Davis, 53, of Placida and Capt. David C. Chatham, 35, of Port Charlotte entered not guilty pleas on Monday in connection with a May 28 FWC “boating safety and resource inspection” sweep that specifically targeted traditional live bait fishing guides operating charters in the Pass.

Assistant State Attorney Larry D. Justham, who spearheads the county court division, declined comment on the cases brought by the FWC against the two local guides. Justham referred all questions, including those concerning the as-yet unresolved Huddleston case, to the state attorney’s press office. Communications Director Samantha Syoen said she was unable to comment on an active prosecution, but noted the state attorney’s office is “working closely with the FWC” on the matter.

Huddleston’s next court date is June 27 when he is slated to appear before Judge H. Andrew Swett at 8 a.m. in Fort Myers. Charges against Huddleston stem from a May 15 incident when FWC officers say they spotted one of Huddleston’s clients fishing what they said was “an obvious illegal jig” in Boca Grande Pass. The bottom-weighted jig, popular among PTTS competitors, was outlawed by the FWC in September, 2013 when it was determined to be a foul-hooking or “snagging” device.

The FWC subsequently came under fire for opting to issue Huddleston a written warning rather than a formal second degree misdemeanor charge for violating the widely reported nine-month old jig prohibition.

FWC Capt. Guy Carpenter, who oversees the agency’s law enforcement efforts in Lee and Charlotte counties, has sought to defend the decisions his officers made in the Huddleston matter by noting the FWC’s “enforcement philosophy is to start out heavy on the education side” and that “we have to educate people.”

Critics have questioned the need for “education” in the Huddleston case, however, pointing to reports filed by both officers referencing Huddleston’s “knowledge and experience” and that the 44-year-old Palm Harbor man is and has been employed as a long-time professional fishing guide.

The same reports state Huddleston appeared to hurriedly instruct one of his clients to lower the illegal gear into the water when he saw the FWC officers approach to make their inspection.

The reports contain no indication Huddleston attempted to claim he was unaware of the regulation. Rather, the reports state, Huddleston sought to place blame for the presence of the banned devices being fished from his boat on his absent and unnamed “mate.” Huddleston did, however, receive a citation for using “breakaway” tackle in conjunction with the illegal jigs. Again, according to the reports, he offered no defense.

By contrast, reports show both Chatham and Davis vigorously defended the legality of their gear two weeks later when FWC officers selectively stopped and inspected more than a dozen traditional live-bait “Pass Boats.”

In Chatham’s case, an FWC officer was repeatedly unable to “break away” the gear the officer would later claim was designed to break away. Davis similarly objected, noting that the same gear that drew his break-away gear citation had, just moments earlier and in sight of the officers, successfully boated a tarpon without the weight breaking free. The reports state the officer who nevertheless issued the citation “took his objections into consideration.”

The FWC’s “boating safety and resource inspection” sweep of the local Pass Boat fleet came on the heels of an online uproar fueled by those in the Tampa area jig fishing community who contended Huddleston had been targeted by the FWC due to his notoriety as a PTTS jig angler.

The jig anglers’ complaints against the FWC ended abruptly when a Tampa-area newspaper reported the Davis and Chatham citations just hours after they were issued and days before the FWC was able to provide other media outlets with information concerning the two cases.

‘The assumption that jiggers can easily switch to another lure isn’t true’

Maus 2

Florida Tarpon Anglers president and Simrad representative Mark Maus.

On September 5, 2013, Tallahassee lobbyist Lane Stephens addressed the seven members of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission in Pensacola prior to their unanimous vote to outlaw the so-called “Pass Jig.”

Stephens spoke in opposition to the rule on behalf of Florida Tarpon Anglers Association vice-president and Professional Tarpon Tournament Series angler Craig Abbott as well as FTA president Mark Maus, a tournament angler best known for his association with Simrad Yachting and its parent company Navico

In his remarks to the FWC eight months ago, Stephens predicted exactly what we’re seeing happening today in Boca Grande Pass. His words were prophetic.

The assumption that jiggers can easily switch to another lure isn’t true,” he told the commission.

With the apparent blessing of Abbott, Simrad’s Maus, the PTTS (“our world class competitors have already developed new artificial lure designs“) and others, Mr. Stephens told the commissioners exactly what they could expect. And he put his prediction on the record.

The assumption that jiggers can easily switch to another lure isn’t true.

As Mr. Stephens promised eight months ago, his prophecy has come true. Painfully true. And, as the PTTS also promised when the tournament put the FWC on notice following the jig ban vote, “we’re confident additional designs will continue to be developed.” Designs developed for anglers who, as their own lobbyist admitted, can’t “easily switch to another lure.” We’ll let you connect the dots.

It appears we’ve found two promises Abbott, Maus and the PTTS have had absolutely no trouble keeping.

 

FWC rules ‘new jig’ is illegal

Illegal "Jig"It’s official. And it didn’t take long. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is telling its law enforcement officers that the “new and improved” tarpon jig (see photo) that turned up recently in Boca Grande Pass isn’t new and it isn’t improved.

It’s illegal.

And like the vote that banned the bottom-weighted hook last year, the decision was unanimous.

Thomas Graef, the FWC’s regional director for Southwest Florida, agrees. Capt. Guy Carpenter, FWC law enforcement supervisor for Lee and Charlotte counties, agrees. And Nick Wiley, executive director of the FWC, agrees. And they’ve put it in writing.

They all agree. And there’s no wiggle room on this one. It’s simple. Use the new jig and you’re breaking the law.

“The jig depicted in the drawing (the photo above) is not legal as the weight appears to be designed to slide down the shank,” Carpenter wrote.

“If a fisherman in Boca Grande is found to be in possession of one, it’s prohibited use will be explained and properly documented.”

Carpenter continues. “If the fisherman is found to be fishing it, the violation will handled appropriately based on knowledge and prior contact.”

Translation: Use the “new jig,” get caught using the new jig, and the FWC will give you a warning. Do it twice, and the FWC will give you a second degree misdemeanor prosecution.

The determination was made and announced by Carpenter late Monday night. “A tug pulls the eye of the from under zip tie and hook point rips from plastic soft body tail,” the FWC said. In other words, a flick of the wrist turns the “new jig” into the “old jig.”

A memo detailing the FWC’s determination has been circulated among the area’s FWC law enforcement officers. According to the FWC, those law enforcement officers will be in the Pass and they’ll be looking for violators.

Unless stowed out of reach, just having a new jig or an old jig while in Boca Grande Pass – whether it’s used or not – is also a violation.

(How does the “new jig” become the “old jig?” All it takes is a jerk. And a quick tug on the line. Check out the video below.)

Incident Summary Report Salem Perry 1 6

Florida FIsh and Wildlife Conservation Commission

The ‘new jig’ is here, and it’s the same old scam

Boca Grande Jig 2.0Save The Tarpon, along with its more than 25,000 members and supporters, welcomes you to Boca Grande and our iconic fishery, the migratory home of the storied Silver King. We wish you the best of luck, as well as some great tarpon fishing stories and memories that will last forever.

There’s a situation we’re dealing with that you need to know about before dropping that first line in the water. Late last year the rules governing tarpon fishing in Boca Grande Pass were changed by the people who write Florida’s fish and game rules. And, as expected, not everyone is playing by those rules. There is a very real risk your fishing trip of a lifetime could become a very real nightmare.

The promised “new jig” has made its long-awaited debut in Boca Grande Pass. It’s a clumsy and obvious ruse that isn’t fooling anyone, including law enforcement. All it takes is a flick of the wrist, and the familiar-looking contraption in the photo transforms into the same old notorious bottom weighted tarpon-snagging machine outlawed last year by a unanimous vote of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

How? An oversized hook is flimsily rigged to pierce the edge of “Jig 2.0’s” latex tail. This is designed to change the angle of the thing and, in theory, elevate the weight above the hook. To temporarily make it look all legal-like. As you can see from the photos, it comes close. But not quite.

…if this gear is on board a fishing vessel while inside the boundaries of the Pass, it cannot be attached to any rod, line or leader and must be stowed.

Once the device hits the water, the captain gives it a quick jerk, the hook breaks free, the rod and its now-bottom weighted and illegal “jig” are handed off to the unsuspecting client and they’re back to fishing and flossing like it’s 2013.

The regulations (and they’re regulations, not suggestions) adopted by the FWC are pretty specific. In the FWC’s words: “Fishing with gear that has a weight attached to a hook, artificial fly or lure in such a way that the weight hangs lower than the hook when the line or leader is suspended vertically from the rod is prohibited.”

Further, “if this gear is on board a fishing vessel while inside the boundaries of the Pass, it cannot be attached to any rod, line or leader and must be stowed.” Beyond not using these things, the FWC says you can’t even have them on you or on your rod or anywhere you might be able to get at them while afloat.

The FWC didn’t stop there. The FWC tossed in a little something these geniuses seemingly forgot. The folks at the FWC knew who they were dealing with. The FWC saw them coming when the new Boca Grande gear restrictions were drafted. The FWC anticipated the die-hards would attempt to find a way around the “suspended vertically” test. And, as we’re now seeing, the FWC was right.

While the FWC knew it WOULD happen, the FWC didn’t know exactly HOW it would happen. So the commissioners also adopted language designed to literally “cut them off at the Pass.” It reads: “Snagging, snatch hooking, spearing and the use of a multiple hook in conjunction with live or dead natural bait is prohibited.”

Simply put, snagging and snatch hooking is illegal. Attempting to snag and snatch hook tarpon is illegal. And because the rig in the photo is designed to do just that, you might want to take a close look at what’s on that rod before putting it in your hands. If it looks like the thing in the photo, don’t do it. Your friendly guide is setting you up. If he gets busted, you get to go along for the ride. Cute. And how much did you pay for that charter?

Welcome to Boca Grande. We’re the “Tarpon Fishing Capital of the World.” We want you to enjoy the time you spend with us, and take home some great memories. Getting rung up on a misdemeanor fish and wildlife charge shouldn’t be one of those memories, however. It’s not worth the risk.

Miami Herald: Controversial PTTS goes on with added scrutiny

This article was originally published in the Sunday, April 13, 2014 edition of the Miami Herald. 

By Sue Cocking
scocking@miamiherald.com

When the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission decided last year to ban the use of a popular type of fishing tackle for pursuing tarpon in Southwest Florida’s Boca Grande Pass, many thought that would be the end of the zany reality show/fishing contest known as the Professional Tarpon Tournament Series.

PTTS Tarpon Tournament

A common scene in Boca Grande Pass when the PTTS circus comes to town.

The FWC decided that the “Boca Grande jig” — where the weighted part of the lure hangs below a circle hook — effectively snagged tarpon in the face and body instead of enticing them to strike, and outlawed its use in the Pass. The decision was hailed by a grassroots organization called Save the Tarpon, which had waged boisterous on-water protests and a tireless social-media campaign against the PTTS. Several South Florida guides got involved because many tarpon caught and released in Southwest Florida are recaptured later in Southeast Florida and the Keys.

The tournament reacted by filing suit in Charlotte County Circuit Court against Save the Tarpon, accusing the group of defamation and costing the televised contest some major sponsors. The suit is pending.

Meanwhile, the PTTS is embarking on its 11th year, albeit with fewer sponsors and participants, planning to conduct three men’s and three women’s tournaments beginning May 17 and culminating with the season-ending Tarpon Cup, where a boat, motor and trailer will be awarded to the top overall team. The series will be broadcast later on the World Fishing Network.

“Since the inception of the tournament, there has been a faction of folks against what we are doing,” PTTS founder Joe Mercurio said. “We’re not going to let the decision the FWC made daunt us at all. Our anglers are ready to go out and follow the letter of the law and compete.”

Two of the top competitors vowed to do just that, declaring they don’t need the Boca Grande jig to catch and release big tarpon.

Veteran Tampa fishing guide captain Dave Markett of Team Power Pole, which finished third last season, said he used a “slider” jig most of the time, which allows the weight to slide up and down the line above the hook. He said he also caught and released fish using live bait, such as squirrelfish and crabs, and had success with soft plastic jerkbaits.

“There are no shortcuts to success,” Markett said. “Every captain thinks he has an idea and he thinks it will work.”

Jill Sapp, who fishes on Fins & Tails with her guide/husband captain Troy Sapp, said their team has always fished a combination of lures and live bait.

“We’ve fished all of it,” she said. “The guys that have been doing this a long time, this isn’t their first rodeo. The newer people to it, maybe they won’t hook as many. It is what it is.”

Save the Tarpon members plan to monitor the pass on tournament days with video cameras to see if PTTS competitors are following the law, according to the group’s chairman, Boca Grande captain Tom McLaughlin.

“The part of the jig law that’s important is that the fish pursue the gear and not the gear pursue the fish,” McLaughlin said. “It’s all about preserving sport fishing in Boca Grande Pass. It’s a historical fishery and it should be protected.”

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2014/04/13/4056127/controversial-ptts-goes-on-with.html

Best-Selling Author Randy Wayne White Crusades to Protect Tarpon

This article was originally published in the March 2014 issue of Sarasota Magazine.

Written by Sarasota Magazine contributing editor, Tony D’Souza.

Randy Wayne White

Best-selling Southwest Florida thriller writer Randy Wayne White crusades to protect the region’s tarpon.

To hear author, restaurateur and angling activist Randy Wayne White tell it, as he recently did at his Doc Ford’s Rum Bar & Grille on Sanibel Island, all of us Southwest Floridians are here because of a fish. Because of its fight, the lightning-quick way it rolls and leaps when it strikes, and because of its strength and beauty. That fish is Megalops atlanticus, an archaic, cow-eyed, thick-jawed feeding machine that can reach eight feet in length and weigh 250 pounds. Tourists call it “tar-pon.” The rest of us say “tarp-in.” No matter how you pronounce the name, the tarpon with its silver-dollar scales has always meant money, and that’s at the heart of a recent controversy that embroiled White and the organizers of a high-stakes fishing tournament down in Boca Grande.

“When the first tarpon was landed on rod and reel in 1885 in Sanibel,” White, sitting before an opened laptop in his bar where I’ve caught him writing, tells me, “it made headlines. This was the only big game fish that one could land in a rowboat. Industrialists began to come to this pioneer mangrove coast. Thomas Edison wanted to catch a tarpon, he came here. The Charlotte Northern Railway extended its service to Boca Grande; that began hotels. The tarpon changed the destiny of this coast.”

White is an amicable guy, a youthful 63, a baseball-playing Midwest farmhand who came to Sanibel in 1972 with a high school degree and a yen to write. He earned his salt as fishing guide and adventure magazine columnist, raised two sons and wrote every day. After churning out 18 novels under pseudonyms, he finally found a character, a former NSA agent and marine biologist named Doc Ford, which led to a best-selling series of thrillers, the first of which was 1990′s Sanibel Flats. The series’ popularity has allowed White and his business partners to commercialize the Doc Ford name into three restaurants, a hot sauce line, T-shirts and golf visors. And last year, White used his literary muscle to weigh in on what many here see as the ugliest chapter in the tarpon’s history.

The “Boca Grande jig” masquerades as a traditional jig hook but is designed to sink steel into tarpon even when the fish aren’t biting. When a fish strikes a true jig, it’s hooked inside the mouth; with the belly-weighted Boca Grande jig, an angler drops the hook to the bottom, waits for a fish to bump the line, then reels as fast as he can. The line “flosses” beside the fish, often sliding through its gill plate, and the heavy jig streaks up like a fist and punches its hook into the fish’s face or body.

In a special commentary in the Tampa Tribune in April, White wrote, “In the early 1990s, when tarpon tournament purses in Boca Grande Pass climbed to $100,000 or more, two local anglers revived an old poaching technique that guaranteed they would boat tarpon and also fill their pockets…. Among guides, ‘jig fishing’ became the accepted euphemism for snag fishing, but always in a wink-wink sort of way because boating fish is key to making money…. The technique wasn’t illegal, but most of us knew it wasn’t ethical…How do I know this is true? Because, as a fishing guide, I did it.”

Prior to the new gear restrictions passed by FWC in 2013, most of the Professional Tarpon Tournament Series anglers relied on the unethical "Boca Grande jig" to snag tarpon and earn valuable "face time" on TV for their sponsors.

Prior to the new gear restrictions passed by FWC in 2013, most of the Professional Tarpon Tournament Series anglers relied on the unethical “Boca Grande jig” to snag tarpon and earn valuable television “face time” for their sponsors.

The “Boca Grande jig” masquerades as a traditional jig hook but is designed to sink steel into tarpon even when the fish aren’t biting. When a fish strikes a true jig, it’s hooked inside the mouth; with the belly-weighted Boca Grande jig, an angler drops the hook to the bottom, waits for a fish to bump the line, then reels as fast as he can. The line “flosses” beside the fish, often sliding through its gill plate, and the heavy jig streaks up like a fist and punches its hook into the fish’s face or body.

“Snagging is taboo in the world of sport fishing,” White tells me as he leads me around his restaurant. “It’s the equivalent of harpooning or using dynamite.” The island-themed Doc Ford’s is packed for dinner, the genteel patrons dressed in polos and khaki. White spends a few minutes chatting with two couples from Kansas City, Dee and Frank Mana and Kathie and Phil Ziegler, who tell me they’re here because of the Doc Ford series. White signs a book, “Dear Dee, Doc’s Pal!,” then urges the group to, “Try the hot sauce.”

Out in his truck, White riffs on the surreal success of his books and the restaurants, which has come later in life for a writer whose early days often did not include hot water or A/C. “I did many years with no safety net,” he tells me as we pause to let some beach tourists scamper across the road. “Every day now, it just feels dreamlike. Peter Matthiessen [the National Book Award-winning author of the Watson Trilogy] gives me a hard time about being commercial. He says, ‘So, Randolph, are you going into real estate?’ I say to him, ‘A Killing Mister Watson oyster bar. Think of the T-shirts.’”

Soon we’re at Doc Ford’s on Captiva Island, a cavernous 400-seater, and White winds his way to the back bar, greeting fans and staff alike. At the bar, I ask a red-haired lady sipping a cocktail if she reads the Doc Ford series. She takes a hard look at the man beside me and says, “Are you the Randy White?”

“If you knew me, you’d run like the wind,” he tells her. Soon, he’s posing for a picture, and then we’re talking tarpon again. White says, “When they first started using [the Boca Grande jig], I had a client who would book me every year during tarpon season. I told him about it and he said, ‘Let’s go out and try it.’ I wired a very heavy weight, probably three ounces, to the hook. He landed two fish; one was hooked under the lateral fin. They’re almost all hooked outside the mouth [using the Boca Grande jig].”

The practice might have continued if not for the 2003 entry of the Professional Tarpon Tournament Series into Boca Grande Pass. Hosted by Sarasota’s Joe Mercurio, the PTTS and its sister series, the Women’s Professional Tarpon Tournament, have the richest tarpon purses in the world. This year, they’ll offer more than $500,000 in prizes.

From the beginning, the PTTS drew criticism. “The Pass’s characteristics are such that the tarpon are contained in an area and must stack up,” explains White. “To snag fish effectively, you need a very fast boat, and during the tournaments we’re talking a hundred or more. It’s day after day of these high-speed pursuits of these fish who are there to feed and fatten and do this little-understood ceremony that’s prelude to their mating. It’s just a circus.”

Like White, the PTTS and Joe Mercurio are commerce-savvy, though the tournament targets a different audience. Its marketing videos highlight the very things White and other PTTS critics abhor: teams of sponsorship-clad fishermen in sponsorship-wrapped boats, all in a frenzied pursuit of fish. The videos’ background music is high-octane synthesizer, the feel is NASCAR. “The PTTS pits 50 teams in a head-to-head gunnel-to-gunnel battle,” the announcer intones in the 2010 video. “The playing field can only be described as controlled chaos.” The PTTS TV series reaches 42 million viewers and is co-hosted by a Sarasota-based blond bombshell, Sheli Sanders. Prominent in the videos are bull and hammerhead sharks chomping through tarpon even as the anglers reel them in.

What White and groups like Save the Tarpon of Boca Grande Pass argue is that the tournament uses the doctored jig and harasses the fish at a critical time in its breeding cycle. Bowing to pressure from Boca Grande guides, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission (FWC) conducted a $200,000 foul-hooking study from 2002-2004. Surprisingly, the FWC did not find that the Boca Grande jig was hooking tarpon outside the mouth.

White says: “In the study, 75 percent to 80 percent are hooked in the mouth. But people did not ask what constitutes ‘mouth.’ The study’s definition is essentially this: Any bone in the tarpon’s head connected to its mouth [is its mouth]. The study has done more to harm tarpon in the last 10 years than any number of tarpon fishermen.”

Read the rest of the story here.

Save the Tarpon Seafood Shindig!

2014 STT Shindig

SUN. MARCH 2, 2014
2 – 6 PM @ BOCA GRANDE COMMUNITY CENTER PARK

Directions

SAVE THE TARPON
SEAFOOD SHINDIG

Celebrate the future of our tarpon fishery with live music, fresh local seafood, and a couple hundred like-minded friends.

Live music, seafood chowder & stew cook-off, fried grouper bites, complimentary Budweiser refreshments…what’s not to like?  C’mon out and enjoy a late Sunday afternoon with us, don’t be shy.

We want to listen to some music, partake in the eating of some tasty fish (fresh off the boat, we might add), refresh our palettes with a cold Budweiser, and delight in some cotton-candy…with you.

There will be lots of fun things to do.  Like, talking to your friends about tarpon fishing. And, the silent and live auctions will be the coolest.  Oh, and don’t forget the prize wheel; We will be bringing it back with even better prizes this year.

What it’s all about.

We can look back at 2013 as a watershed year that saw our combined efforts produce two landmark regulatory reforms that will, with aggressive enforcement and your
continued vigilance, give Florida’s most iconic tarpon fishery the kind of fighting chance that once seemed so beyond our reach.

With a new season of tarpon fishing on the horizon, let’s take a moment to celebrate these accomplishments and look forward to a new year of continued positive change for our beloved fishery.

Go to our Facebook Event Page.

 

 

 

Judge slaps PTTS owners with sanctions, legal fees over ‘baseless’ lawsuit claims

Mr. Lew Hastings & Capt. Tom McLaughlin

Lew Hastings, Executive Director of the Boca Grande Chamber of Commerce (left), and Capt. Tom McLaughlin, Chairman of Save the Tarpon (right) at the 2013 Save the Tarpon Shindig on March 3. It is this photo which led the PTTS to name Lew Hastings personally in the suit against Save the Tarpon.

This article was originally published in the Boca Beacon on January 29, 2014.

The owners of the Professional Tarpon Tournament Series and their Tampa attorney will be paying the legal bills of three Save The Tarpon Inc. directors after a Charlotte County Circuit Court judge slapped them with sanctions on Tuesday, Jan. 28 under a rarely-invoked state statute aimed at curbing so-called frivolous litigation.

Judge Joseph G. Foster ruled that Silver King Entertainment Inc., which owns and operates the PTTS, and their lawyer Dennis A. Creed of the Tampa firm Feldman Morgado must pay legal fees incurred by Save The Tarpon directors Chris Frohlich, Lew Hastings and Tommy Locke III.

The three were initially named in a lawsuit filed against the Boca Grande-based conservation group last year in which the tournament claimed Save the Tarpon had cost the PTTS more than $500,000 in sponsorship and other revenues. Frohlich, Hastings and Locke were subsequently dropped from the suit.

Read the rest of the story…

You made it happen in 2013, but the job is far from over

Protest Boats At Dock

Back in the spring of 2012, a defiant Gary Ingman proclaimed his Professional Tarpon Tournament Series wouldn’t stop the gaffing, the dragging, the snagging and the televised hijacking of Boca Grande Pass – all brought to you by his “controlled chaos” wrap boat spandex rodeo – until “someone tells us to stop.” In 2013, you told him enough was enough. In 2013, you told him to stop.

As we look ahead to 2014, we can look back at 2013 as a watershed year that saw our combined efforts produce two landmark regulatory reforms that will, with aggressive enforcement and your continued vigilance, give Florida’s most iconic tarpon fishery the kind of fighting chance that once seemed so beyond our reach. But you made it happen.

In 2013, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission listened to your more than 23,000 voices. It responded by unanimously adopting rules that laid the groundwork needed to continue the job of preserving, protecting and growing the “Tarpon Fishing Capital of the World” for us, our children, our children’s children and beyond. And you made it happen.

You told the FWC the time had come to put an end to gaff, drag, weigh and dump. In 2013, the seven-member commission heard you. It unanimously adopted a rule making tarpon a catch and release species. And we’re going to be in the Pass this spring to make certain this rule is strictly enforced.

Save Some Tarpon For MeYou also told the FWC the time had come to outlaw the bottom weighted snatch hooks popularized by the PTTS and promoted as a legitimate fishing lure to its cable TV “audience.” In September, the FWC listened. Save the Tarpon made your voices heard that day in distant Pensacola as the commission voted 7-0 to beef up its outdated foul-hooking rules and ban the so-called “tarpon jig” from the waters of Boca Grande Pass. You made it happen. And yes, we’ll be there this spring to make certain this rule is strictly enforced.

Your educational efforts also bore fruit in 2013. Your continued support helped us spread the message to those who have since come to understand they were underwriting the potential destruction of a fishery. In 2013, MillerCoors, Yamaha, Costa del Mar, Miller’s Ale House and others showed us and the world they truly are responsible corporate citizens. And you made it happen.

While 2013 will rightfully be remembered as the year you made it happen, 2014 will continue to present opportunities and challenges. In 2013, sport fishing enthusiasts across the globe became aware of the issues threatening Boca Grande Pass thanks to your efforts. They made their voices heard. But we all understand we can’t collectively afford to declare victory, drop our guard and go back to the era of silent indifference that nearly brought us to the brink.

Yet there are those eager to see a return to the days of “anything goes.” As you know, the man who once so defiantly challenged you to make him stop, the man who brought “controlled chaos” to Boca Grande Pass and has signaled his willingness to pay any price to keep it there, has dispatched a small armada of lawyers intent on silencing your voices and reversing the grassroots gains we worked so hard to achieve together in 2013.will rightfully be remembered as the year you made it happen, 2014 will continue to presen challenges.

Flight To Fwc MeetingYou stood up for the future of our fishery in Lakeland, in Pensacola and in Tallahassee. But all we’ve accomplished remains at risk absent the resources we now need to head off efforts by Ingman and others to undo what we’ve worked so long and so hard to make happen over the course of this past year. While our legal team has been supportive in our defense and committed to our shared cause, the fight to keep your voice from being silenced continues to drag through the courts as we enter 2014. Silence didn’t make catch and release happen. Silence didn’t ban the bottom weighted snatch hook. Silence didn’t end the corporate underwriting. Silence did not, and will not, make it happen. We will not be silenced.

We’re grateful to those who have provided so generously of their time, their talents and the resources that have allowed us to stay in the fight and make our voices heard. But despite a continuing string of reversals, the PTTS persists in what has become a transparent bid to shift focus away from the Pass, to thwart our efforts to protect and preserve the fishery, and to return to business as usual. And with every dollar spent, that risk becomes increasingly real. At your urging, we’ll soon be establishing (and, yes, it’s a cliche we hoped to avoid) a “legal defense fund” that will enable us to aggressively put this matter to rest and turn our full attention back to the job that needs to be done. Also, on Sunday, March 2, 2014, we’ll be gathering once again in Boca Grande for the 2nd Annual Save the Tarpon Shindig. Please save the date for Save the Tarpon.

For more information, please don’t hesitate to drop us an email at contact@savethetarpon.com or give Jennifer McLaughlin a call at 941-457-0845. It was a great 2013 for us, for you and the future of our fishery. It’s not going to be an easy act to follow. But, as 2013 revealed, “easy” isn’t in our dictionary. It’s 2014. Together, let’s keep making it happen.

Become a member today.

Parents & Kids Beginning Fishing Seminar – February 1, 2014

Through this seminar, we hope to help educate families who may not have any prior fishing experience, or may not have any local fishing excperience, to have the confidence to explore many of our regions public fishing areas with the confidence and skills necessary to have fun and find success.

Enjoying a day of fishing with your child is a wonderful experience not to be missed by any family residing in Southwest Florida. Through this free seminar, we hope to provide basic angling skills to families with young children so they may begin to explore our regions public fishing areas with confidence and success.

Date: Saturday, February 1, 2014
Time: 10 am to 12 pm
Location:  Boca Grande Community Park (If there is rain, the event will be held indoors at the Boca Grande Community Center)
Directions
Cost: The cost to participate is free, but space is limited.
Extras: Every child attending will receive a rod, reel and tackle courtesy of Save the Tarpon.
How to sign up:  Please fill out the form at the bottom of the page to reserve your spot in this free fishing seminar.  There are 20 spots available for this first seminar.  Each spot is for one child and one accompanying adult.

Save the Tarpon is presenting a free fishing seminar for parents or grandparents to bring their children or grandchildren and learn basic angling skills from some of the areas most respected fishing guides. The guides will work both with the children, and their parents, to provide adequate knowledge for a successful family outing at one of the many public fishing areas found in our region.  We also hope to encourage participation in the local youth fishing tournaments sponsored by Lee County Parks & Rec, by providing the skills and education necessary to form confident young anglers. (For more information on the Youth Fishing Tournament, please contact Joe Wier at (941) 964-2564 or jwier@leegov.com.)

The event is free and open to the public. No prior fishing experience is necessary (its actually preferred).

Leading the seminar is Capt. Frank Davis, Capt. Van Hubbard, Capt. Tom McLaughlin, and Capt. Rhett Morris. The Captains will be available to answer beginner fishing questions.

Topics covered during this fun and informative two hour session include: how to pick out the right gear and tackle, what kinds of bait to use, what licenses you need, where you can go fishing, what you should expect to catch, local laws and regulations, proper fish handling, how to safely revive and release a fish, and much more.

Lee County youth fishing tournament.

Lee County Parks & Recreation sponsors a youth fishing tournament four times a year at the Boca Grande Fishing Pier North.  Children attending our free seminar will have the basic skills needed to enjoy a successful day participating in an event such as this.

All children will leave with a rod, reel, and tackle box complete with the gear needed to fish a local public fishing pier.

You must fill out the form below to reserve your spot in this seminar.

Please fill out the form below to participate in the free fishing seminar on February 1, 2014. Remember, space is limited, so only sign up if you are committed to attending on this day.

If you need to cancel your reservation, please send us an email at contact@savethetarpon.com asap so we may open your spot to another eager young angler. Thank you!

* indicates required field