Project Tarpon’s Scott Alford: ‘Coon Pop’ vs. the bottom weighted ‘Pass Jig’

Lance “Coon” Schouest

Lance “Coon” Schouest, inventor of the “Coon Pop” lure.

The following question concerning the “Coon Pop” lure and any possible similarity to the bottom weighted Boca Grande tarpon jig was presented to Project Tarpon’s Scott Alford on Saturday, June 1 by M, Lane Stephens, a partner in the Tallahassee lobbying firm of SCG Governmental Affairs. Stephens has confirmed he has been retained to lobby on behalf of the  Florida Tarpon Anglers Association.  The organization’s board is comprised entirely of Professional Tarpon Tournament Series participants.

Mr. Stephens’ former and current clients include the Florida Airboat Association and Professional Tarpon Tournament Series sponsor Miller Brewing Company. PTTS team leader Capt. Dave Markett serves on the Airboat Association board.

Markett is an outspoken opponent of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation’s Commission’s proposed rule banning the use of bottom weighted lures in Boca Grande Pass. In a press release announcing Mr. Stephens’ affiliation with the Florida Airboat Association, the organization noted Mr. Stephens’ experience providing “governmental consulting services” on issues before the FWC. (UPDATE: A spokesman for the Airboat Association says Stephens is no longer employed to lobby for the group.)

Alford’s Project Tarpon is based in Texas where the Coon Pop lure is commonly used.

Tarpon snatch hook

Unlike the Coon Pop, the “Boca Grande Tarpon Jig” (above) is fished vertically and is rigged with a weight below the hook making the hook point the first point of contact with the fish.  Historically, any lure weighted at the belly or bend of the hook has been defined as a “snatch hook” or “snag hook.”

Here is the text of Mr. Stephens’ email to Project Tarpon’s Scott Alford:

I was reading some of your posts on Youtube regarding the different use of the Coon Pop in Boca Grande Pass vs Texas and Louisiana. I understand it is generally slow trolled or cast in Tx and LA. However, I’ve read some articles about fishing for tarpon (in) Texas that talks about presenting the lure in a vertical jigging fashion in deeper water in Texas. You seem to be very knowledgeable on this subject and I’d appreciate information you have on the vertical technique used in Texas.

Thanks
Lane Stephens
SCG Governmental Affairs

Here is the text of Scott Alford’s reply:

There really isn’t much “vertical” usage of the jig in Texas in deep water or in Louisiana for that matter. The coon-pop is not really jigged. There are a number of ways it is used over here. I’ll go through each of them with you and explain how it is very different than the Boca Grande Pass.

"Coon Pop" Hook Placement

In this photo you can see the most common hook placement when a tarpon eats a “Coon Pop” fishing lure.

(1) Trolled – we troll up to seven baits with gas inboard boats or with electric trolling motors. The baits are staggered by letting them out for 30 seconds down to 5 seconds (i.e. 30, 25, 20, 15, 10 and 5 seconds – then a three second line sometimes – they are staggered with odd counts on one side and even counts on the other.) The five second line is only about four feet under the water and we are fishing in 35-45 feet of water usually in the open Gulf. The fish are in schools but the fish come to the baits. Most fish get hooked from the inside out, not on the outside of the face – the majority are hooked in the button. The speed these baits are trolled is between 1.5 to 2.5 knots. The rods don’t get picked up until after a bite.

(2) Drifted – this is really just drift trolling. Set up the same except the baits are set on the side of the boat and drifted and we don’t use as many baits. This is just a slow troll. Rods are in rod holders, not held. Same is true for hook sets etc.

(3) Casting – the bait is thrown and then reeled in. Again, this is in the open Gulf and the baits are usually retreived in the upper half of the water column.

Coon Pop Hook Placement

Another example of the most common hook placement found when using the “Coon Pop.”

(4) Use in Pass Cavallo – there is only one natural pass along the Texas coast that frequently has tarpon in the pass where you can fish for them consistently. The pass is relatively narrow and only about twenty feet deep. One guy fishes the pass using coon-pops. He does not hold the rods. The baits are suspended from a few feet off the bottom almost to the surface in rod holders the entire time. Tarpon do not get in the pass in schools as they do in Boca Grande and these fish are usually all post spawn, late summer fish that move into the pass in late afternoon early evening to feed. The fish move in in usually as singles. The fish are eating the jigs from below and the rod is not picked up until the fish is hooked. The boat drifts with the tide, is not maneuvered on top of the fish and the boat drifts over a fish as it goes in or out with the tide. No tide and you have no fish.

The reason a coon-pop works is because a tarpon comes from below and behind the bait to eat it. It can’t see the hook. On trolled baits, I use 150 lb piano wire leader. Casting baits, we usually (use) 120+ lb. mono leaders.

This is not to say that a tarpon won’t eat a jig in Boca Grande Pass. Likely they will.  But as I’ve seen the jig fished, I am skeptical that it is regularly eaten. I’ve seen the hook-up numbers on jigs versus using live bait. A tarpon is more likely to eat a live bait presented than a jig (coon-pop or otherwise). If the jigs are working more consistently than bait, that should be a red flag.

I have advocated that there is a simple way to solve the issue. Get a number of tarpon photographs showing hook placement in tarpon caught with coon-pops in Texas and Louisiana and take a similar, unbiased representation of tarpon caught in Boca Grande Pass using the jig. If there is a difference, you’ll have your answer. Personally, I think they’ll be an obvious one.

Bottom line, our fish are not as concentrated and not vertically concentrated as they are in Boca Grande Pass.

Scott Alford
Project Tarpon

Scott Alford of ProjectTarpon.com responds to Cindy Mercurio

Project TarponCindysays:

“Project Tarpon takes over tarpon tournament” (on Mr. Alford’s website)in Texas. Mr. Alford’s website is sponsored by a yacht company that makes tarpon fishing boats and he sells clothing! Andros Boats is going to the World’s Richest Tarpon Tournament. You guys hoping to get it on tv? Get your own sponsors etc.? This is about power, control and money! The PTTS has continually changed their rules to ensure that the tarpon are handled with care. But it does not matter because you are using the tarpon to gain what you want….YOUR FISHING HOLE FISHED YOUR WAY!

Cindy, I wish you knew me better. If you did, you would know that what I am hoping to do is about as far from power, control or money that it possibly could be. I think we can agree that the problem with assumptions is that they are often not based in fact.

I’ll let you know some things about ProjectTarpon.com. First, in the two years it has existed, it has never made a profit. Really? Yea, really! Winter Custom Yachts doesn’t even pay ProjectTarpon.com to have its ads on the page. I have NO ownership in Winter Custom Yachts and the company has NEVER paid me a dime. I simply built a boat with them and think they are a great company, and I personally like the folks that run the company. Gorgeous boats, love ‘em and really want to see them succeed in their relatively new and young business. Tarpon boats are NOT their specialty nor will they ever be. [ Besides, as long as they are around, I guess my hull warranty is good. :-) hahaha… ]

The other ads on the pages aren’t really any different. They are all folks I know, like, respect and have worked with to help tarpon research. (One of them even competes in the PTTS and has the last two years.) Guides who may advertise on the forums are all given the same deal, you agree to post reports during tarpon season on the forum and you get your ad for free. I’d make the same offer to any PTTS guides who want to do the same thing or any other Boca Grande guide. I think at one time I made $25 off of running some of those banner GoogleAds but never got the check from Google for some reason. They claim they mailed it? I am open to taking pay advertisers on the website but it is not really a priority for me, nor has it ever been. As they say, I have a “day job.” I hope and anticipate ProjectTarpon.com making a little money at some point in the future… I hope… but I never anticipate it keeping me above the poverty level nor would I EVER want to piggy-back on anybody else to actually turn some small profit.

I tell you what, once we agree on a cooperative effort with the PTTS next year on tagging tarpon and get the details settled, I’ll stick an ad up for the PTTS on the website. Sound good? Although, I don’t think ProjectTarpon.com is going to make a dent in anybody knowing about the PTTS but I’ll do it for ya…. for free.

With regard to our tournament “take over”, I solely organized the Tarpon Tomorrow Tournament in Texas and if you had read the rest of my website, you would see that ProjectTarpon.com’s “taking over” of the Tarpon Tomorrow tournament is really just a name change. It was me, myself and I before and it will be me, myself and I this year. The tournament offers no prize money, just trophies. (One year it did have prize money at the request of professional guides, who then did not sufficiently participate to make it worth the hassle, so it was abandoned – the pros seemed to complain and argue…. so I eliminated them too and made it only amateurs. If it ain’t fun, it ain’t worth doing.) This tournament is an amateur angler only tournament and is organized just for fun and to satellite tag tarpon and assist with tarpon research in Texas.

Just so you know the history of this tournament. It was originally run by somebody else. It was called the Texas Tarpon Pro/Am. It was organized to raise money to satellite tag tarpon in Texas. It never really made any money. Then, the guy who ran it moved away from Galveston and decided to abandon it. That very year, we found out the state, the University of Miami, BTT and others were willing to fund satellite tags and wanted a tournament to help get them placed. So… during a Tarpon Tomorrow board meeting, nobody volunteered to run a tournament to help, so I opened my fat mouth. The rest is history. I even remember where I was the day I made that fatefully decision. Standing on a dock in South Carolina while my family sat in a restaurant having dinner during a family vacation so I could be on the phone for the meeting.

The tournament is for fun and its goals are sportsmanship and research. We all go to a little fishing town in Texas, rent rooms in the same hotel, tie our boats at the dock in front of our rooms and have a good time. I don’t compete, I take the biologists out on my boat to tag fish that are caught by others. The competitors are just as happy to see their buddy in the next boat win as they are to take home a trophy for themselves… in fact, when one boat finds fish, they usually call over other competitors… that is an oddity in a tournament. It is what sport fishing should be and I am really proud of everybody that enters the tournament. I consider each and every one of them a friend (all ten to twelve boats or so of them – a whopping turnout huh?).

The tournament has never made any real profit. I think at most about $1k was carried-over to the next year in the bank account to front expenses. There is no TV, there are no sponsors giving the tournament money anymore… any money that is fronted for this effort comes out of my pocket. When companies did sponsor, it was so they could get a logo on the give-away t-shirts and help me cover the costs of the shirts (on which I personally lost money every year). We don’t do shirts anymore so I don’t ask for sponsors anymore. So, that being said, to say this is about power, control or money, I guess it is if you mean LOSING power, control and money.

(And by the way, the reason I started the ProjectTarpon.com website was because the guys at my tournaments started asking, where can I go to find out what happened to the tagged tarpon… wow, there was an idea…. help anglers learn about research on tarpon).

With that background, let me say that I can actually help your son and Gary Ingman. I had a great conversation with Garry and shared it with the world when I did. I posted it here. I am not some black night with some bad agenda controlled by some group in Boca Grande. I love Boca Grande and have fished there for years and years. Traveling and spending my money locally. Pass fishing is not really my preferred way of fishing so I personally don’t really care who is in the pass doing what. I only want to help the fishery. I think Gary got that impression from my conversation with him. That is why he wants to keep talking with me about what we can do together. I may have opinions, but don’t we all. I am still open minded and as I have always said, I would love for the satellite tags to prove that that PTTS does not harm fish. After all, if the satellite tags show the fish survive, then aren’t I your best spokesman?

To reduce your concerns about power, control and money, I would be more than happy to agree that during any tagging at the PTTS tournaments, I will exclude all logos, reference or anything related to ProjectTarpon.com. In fact, please don’t mention my name or ProjectTarpon.com at ALL. (I don’t even plan on playing a big part in it other than coordinating with researchers, since I live 1k miles away and can’t afford to be there all the time.) There will be absolutely no references to anybody who advertises on my page (free or not), the Winter Custom Yachts boat I fish on will not be there, so your sponsors need not worry, and I will be sure not to wear any clothing containing any logos of anybody whatsoever. I will be happy to wear a PTTS shirt if somebody will provide one. Shoot, if it is important to ya, I’ll even buy it.

As you can see, this not about ProjectTarpon.com, its not really about the PTTS, its about tarpon… I thought I said that somewhere before?

Please just do me one personal favor – call Gary, get my phone number and call me on the phone if you have a concern. Joe is more than welcome to call me too. I’d love to talk with you or your son in more detail. Just please don’t attack me with assumptions that aren’t fair and that you don’t really know about. We don’t have to agree…. but that doesn’t mean we can’t “get along” enough to help tarpon and help maybe end some of the divisiveness that only hurts tarpon fishing and sportsmanship in general. Agreed?

Senior Vice President of Florida Guides Association makes position clear

Captain Troy Sapp, Fishing GuideThe following is an email we received from Capt. Troy Sapp, senior vice-president of the Florida Guides Association, PTTS participant, and a seasonal Tarpon Guide in the Boca Grande Area in response to our posting of a letter by Scott Alford of ProjectTarpon.com:

Mr. Alford,

Seeing you have tagged a lot of Tarpon and you know which ones lived or died could you please post the Data and the post release mortality rates. I too have DNA, sonic tag sampled and PAT sampled a fairly large amount for BTT and FWRI. 

With the known post release Mortality rates it seems that the PTTS would have a very small impact on the fishery as a whole when you consider the total directed effort on the Tarpon fishery. The other thing that troubles me about the fishery we only know the mortality rates of the fish we tag.

What happens to a tarpon that has been hooked and escapes capture? Could we presume that this escaped fish may have been hooked in a soft tissue area "Throat, Stomach" and the hook tore free. Tarpon are suction feeders and they don't chew their food. What goes in their mouth is headed straight to their stomach and many times attached to a very sharp J hook. Just because a hook is in the bony area of the mouth on the fish we land doesn't mean that is the first place that the hook came in contact with the fish.

I also question what happens to a hooked fish when it jumps violently multiple times. Is this tarpon not subjecting itself to the same stresses as being hoisted out of the water? Have you not observed Tarpon shaking their head so violently that blood comes from their gills or that they excrete spawning fluids?  How many times have you seen the heavy leader pulled back through the gill plates during the fight?

I am asking these questions as there are many individuals that claim to hook several hundred fish a year. If they land 50% of them some are going to perish. If this is about saving tarpon we better come up with some answers and a different plan.  

Yes I participate in the PTTS. But the number of fish I handle and weigh is insignificant in comparison to fish I bring boat side either on my charters or recreationally fishing with my family and friends. I Tarpon fish in many regions and with a variety of methods. It is interesting how many juvenile "under 20 pounds" gut hooked fish I have landed in comparison to adult fish. Could it be that the smaller fish don't pull hard enough to tear loose? Maybe that's another factor we should consider when fishing natural bait.

If Tarpon are truly in trouble there are many factors to be considered.  Picking 1 event and  1 method of fishing  and attacking it like it's the cure all doesn't represent well for trying to save Tarpon. I wish it were that simple but it's not.

It would be nice to advocate mandatory use of circle hooks.
Know the dynamics and water quality effects now that the shipping channel in and out of BGP are no longer being dredged and are filling in.
A stock assessment.
Conditions of the estuaries where juvenile spend their youth.

You know, the things that may make a real impact on a fishery where no intentional harvest takes place.

Respectfully,

Capt. Troy P. Sapp

The Following is our response, sent directly to Capt. Troy Sapp:

Dear Mr. Sapp,
Thank you for your comment submission on SaveTheTarpon.com.  As I am sure you are aware, it was not approved for inclusion in the discussion. We felt the subject of your questions and concerns were better suited for Scott Alford’s site, ProjectTarpon.com.  Your questions have been forwarded to Scott Alford so he may address them directly. Again, thank you for your participation on our site.  We welcome any future comments you may have.  Please keep in mind we try to keep the discussion focused around the mission of our website–the preservation and protection of the Boca Grande tarpon fishery.

Regards, Jennifer McLaughlin

The following is the next contact we have with Capt. Troy Sapp, senior vice president of the Florida Guides Association:

How does a realtor/ artist become the moderator for a organization that claims they are about saving Tarpon? What are your qualifications or first hand experience concerning Tarpon? My comments did nothing more than raise some valid questions about the fishery you say you are trying to protect. Why would you not want your followers to engage in conversation where valid questions concerning tarpon are presented?

I already know the answer.
Your mission is very clear.

I have a feeling you are going to get what your asking for and then some. Myself and many other guides will be in the pass next year if anyone is fishing in there. We will also frequent the beach and harbor more. I have spoken to over 20 guides who will not be run off if their preferred methods of fishing are changed. Certainly the PTTS being there or not won't make a difference. There are many that have established a good bit of business in BGP. I really don't think any of my clients care how when or where they catch fish.

Good luck trying to save the tarpon of Boca grande pass, the same fish that swim around all over the state. No matter the outcome your mission will do nothing to Save the Tarpon. This issue isn't like commercial fishing.

You can't buy your way into it while locking out others.
Capt. Troy P. Sapp Fins and Tails Guide Servicehttp://finsandtailsguideservice.com/#welcome Florida Guides Assoc. Senior Vice Pres. Tsapp22334@aol.com WWW.Florida-guides.com

Well Capt. Sapp, no one at Save the Tarpon is looking to “lock others out.”  No one is asking any person who has come here to fish to  in the past not come here and fish in the future.  What we are asking is for an end to a made for TV series, turned charter booking service, that looks to exclude all others from fishing the pass by employing hyper-aggressive fishing techniques in order to protect “a good bit of business they have established in BGP.”  We are also asking that those that fish for Tarpon in the Boca Grande area use handling techniques that, to the best of their ability, ensure the highest chances of survival of the fish they are targeting unless they plan to harvest the fish. We also want those who are deliberately mishandling those fish in order to increase revenue for their TV show to stop both the mishandling, and the exclusion of all other anglers in order to further the success of their charter booking service, namely the PTTS.

If we are successful in that mission, then we will re-evaluate our situation and come up with a direction to take our organization that we feel best supports our stated mission and that is within our area of expertise and the scope of our organization at that time.

The constant threat from PTTS participants that “the pass will be closed to all fishing if you don’t stop this” will not stop us from supporting what we believe is right.  Should we stop calling attention to what you are doing if  we feel it is wrong simply out of fear of the repercussions? If the situation is so dire, shouldn’t the PTTS be doing more to help curb the user group conflicts and fish handling problems?  Why does the PTTS go to such great lengths to hide what they are doing from the public if there really is nothing to hide?

The mission of Save the Tarpon is very clearly established and can be found on the About Us page, along with a current list of our board of directors. There are no ulterior motives.  Any motivations you may assume we have are just that, assumptions.  We are not looking to exclude anyone from use of the pass, as a matter of fact we are fighting to STOP the exclusion of fishermen from the pass.  You can cling to your assertion that Save the Tarpon is simply a front for BTT or the BGFGA all you want, but I believe our board of directors makes up a representative sample of two members from virtually all of the user groups who have an interest in Tarpon fishing in Boca Grande Pass or the surrounding area.  The universal support by all other user groups who have rallied on behalf of Save the Tarpon to stop the for-profit exploitation of the public resource in Boca Grande pass at the hands of the Professional Tarpon Tournament Series and the Florida Guides Association certainly speaks volumes to the validity of our mission. The same cannot be said for those coming to the defense of the PTTS.

We have left the door open to your involvement in this discussion, as long as it pertains to subject matter that falls within the scope of our mission and our area of expertise.  We also invite you personally to involve yourself in our forum which is specifically designed to answer questions people may have, whether in support of our movement or not, in an open, public, and controlled environment.  you can read more at:

http://savethetarpon.com/save-the-tarpon-opens-forum-for-questions/

Capt. Tom McLaughlin

Save The Tarpon

Project Tarpon on PTTS: ‘Virtually all of them die’

Team Sea HuntThe following is an unsolicited response from Project Tarpon‘s Scott Alford to Save The Tarpon’s earlier post “Study was a ‘win-win’ for tarpon, a ‘lose-lose’ for PTTS.” 

The PTTS crowd likely will attack me. They will link me to this group or that group but linking me to some group does not have anything to do with what ProjectTarpon.com stands for. ProjectTarpon.com’s only interest is tarpon.  ProjectTarpon.com does not have a dog in the jig vs. no jig debate or in the use of the Pass by one group or the other. What I do know is Boca Grande tarpon swim all around the Gulf. That makes those females in Boca Grande important to tarpon everywhere in the Gulf of Mexico. That makes it more than a Florida issue. It makes it an Atlantic tarpon issue.

From my satellite tagging experience (having participated in the tagging of all but a couple of the satellite tagged tarpon in Texas), I know which fish we released lived, which died and which were preyed on by sharks. Knowing if a release fish lived or died for sure lets you learn a few things about releasing tarpon. One of the things I learned (the hard way) is the type of handling being undertaken in the PTTS is not stacking the odds in the tarpon’s favor for survival. Do some live? Probably, but from my personal experience, I’d bet virtually all of them die.

After sending the letter and receiving absolutely no response from the PTTS, coupled with the reports that started to surface in the month following my letter, I became concerned with the possible hypocrisy of the PTTS. I have friends that fish in kill tournaments in Louisiana. I’ve never killed a tarpon in a kill tournament and never will, but at least when my friends go and fish a kill tournament they’re honest about it. Do I wish they wouldn’t? Absolutely. I am doing things to change that practice? Absolutely. Will that likely make me unpopular with some of my friends? Absolutely, but it won’t stop me.

My letter to the PTTS and making it public will likely make ProjectTarpon.com and me very unpopular with a number of folks involved with the PTTS. They may attack me, attack who I am and come after my website. I say bring it…. but if you’re willing to put your money where your mouth is… let me come tag some fish. I’ll give you the chance to prove me wrong. I’d welcome it. If you can prove the PTTS is not killing tarpon with its weigh and release program, I will be the first to stand up and say I was wrong and shake your hand for proving me wrong. However, if you never let me try….. well, then shame on you. Silence often is louder than any personal attack on me. The offer still
stands – let me tag and we’ll end this debate once and for all. Either way, tarpon win!!

– Scott Alford, Project Tarpon

Study was a ‘win-win’ for tarpon, a ‘lose-lose’ for the PTTS

Inserting Satellite Tarpon Tag

Measuring a big tarpon and inserting a satellite tag means holding the tarpon at each end, and hoping it doesn't explode into life at the wrong moment. Photo by Joe Richard © 2012

In a letter dated May 4, 2012, Project Tarpon’s Scott Alford requested the Professional Tarpon Tournament Series cooperate in a “collaborative effort” to satellite tag fish caught and weighed by the PTTS. The project would be fully funded.”At least two of the tarpon research projects being conducted by the marine biologists at the University of Miami could draw a great deal of benefit from the participation of the anglers competing in the Professional Tarpon Tournament Series,” he wrote. “The first is the tarpon specific weight formula research, and the second project is the satellite tagging program.”

The “tarpon specific weight formula” is a reference to a project to fine tune a method of calculating a fish’s weight by measuring it at the boat rather than towing it to the beach and hoisting it on a scale.

He notes that “since killing tarpon is prohibited in many locations and certainly frowned on in most, it is difficult for these researchers to obtain weight data for tarpon.” But luckily “the PTTS offers a unique opportunity for the biologists …”

He continues: “The possible cooperation between the PTTS and biologists is obviously a win-win for both.”

And finally: “The PTTS has a long standing cooperation with biologists and research efforts. The satellite tagging seems like a natural and easy fit to further the PTTS’s conservation and research objectives.” And “this is truly a great opportunity for both the PTTS and tarpon research. I hope we can make it happen.”

The PTTS, Alford says, never responded. They didn’t “make it happen.” Color us shocked. Not much of surprise on this one.

Alford, of course, never had a chance. A satellite tag, obviously, would track the movement of the tournament’s tarpon after they are gaffed, towed, hoisted from the water and released. The same tag would also, obviously, track the non-movement of the tournament’s tarpon after they are gaffed, towed, hoisted from the water and released. You can do the math. The PTTS already did.

The PTTS also knows those weigh boat shots, those up close and personal eye candy interviews with the jubilant team captain, make Must See TV for the folks watching at home. A perfected tarpon specific weight formula would end the need for gaff, drag and weigh. The scales could be replaced by a far less photogenic and equally boring boatside tape measure. The tarpon would obviously benefit. But what do fish know about making good TV?

Tarpon satellite tag, painted a dull color so it won't invite unwanted attention from other fish. This tarpon is about to swim free. Photo by Joe Richard © 2012

In his letter, Alford also notes that “the PTTS gains by having additional material for the TV shows, which many viewers will likely find fascinating …”

In reality, many viewers will likely find it fascinating that most of those satellite tags on those “live release” tarpon aren’t moving.

After waiting, and waiting, and waiting for a response from the PTTS, a frustrated Alford went public with his letter. He could have saved himself the stamp.

PTTS apologists will likely claim Project Tarpon has some sinister agenda. They will, given enough time, ultimately link Project Tarpon to al-Qaeda and Planned Parenthood. That this new-fangled satellite technology is unproven. That developing a tarpon specific weight formula is yet another attempt at phony baloney voodoo science. The PTTS noise machine will, predictably, drone away.

Alford unintentionally went to the heart of the debate (and ended any chance the PTTS would cooperate) by noting “killing tarpon is prohibited in many locations and certainly frowned on in most.” That in this respect, “the PTTS offers a unique opportunity.”

We didn’t know how special we were.

See for yourself. You can read Alford’s letter here. The gaff and drag Photoshop Rangers over at that other Internet place can have someone read it to them.

Project Tarpon requested assistance from PTTS in satellite tagging program.

This message was sent to us from Alan Scott Alford of Project Tarpon:

I help spearhead the satellite tagging of tarpon in Texas and work with BTT and the University of Miami on the efforts in Texas and elsewhere (Nicaragua etc.).  I talked with Joe M. a couple years back about possibly placing satellite tags in fish during the PTTS.  He seemed somewhat receptive to possibly doing it.  In early May of 2012, I sent the PTTS and Joe M. a letter…. asking for their consent to allow us to satellite tarpon caught and weighed in the tournament.  It received no response.  It would seem that satellite tagging of tarpon would be good publicity and make for great TV.  It would have cost the PTTS nothing.  Also, wouldn’t this have answered the question, once and for all?  Why didn’t they agree?  I am making this letter public, because I think it is important to the discussion that the PTTS never responded.

Please feel free to share our letter and the link below.  Some may find it interesting.

Project Tarpon’s Letter to the PTTS