The ‘new jig’ is here, and it’s the same old scam

Boca Grande Jig 2.0Save The Tarpon, along with its more than 25,000 members and supporters, welcomes you to Boca Grande and our iconic fishery, the migratory home of the storied Silver King. We wish you the best of luck, as well as some great tarpon fishing stories and memories that will last forever.

There’s a situation we’re dealing with that you need to know about before dropping that first line in the water. Late last year the rules governing tarpon fishing in Boca Grande Pass were changed by the people who write Florida’s fish and game rules. And, as expected, not everyone is playing by those rules. There is a very real risk your fishing trip of a lifetime could become a very real nightmare.

The promised “new jig” has made its long-awaited debut in Boca Grande Pass. It’s a clumsy and obvious ruse that isn’t fooling anyone, including law enforcement. All it takes is a flick of the wrist, and the familiar-looking contraption in the photo transforms into the same old notorious bottom weighted tarpon-snagging machine outlawed last year by a unanimous vote of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

How? An oversized hook is flimsily rigged to pierce the edge of “Jig 2.0’s” latex tail. This is designed to change the angle of the thing and, in theory, elevate the weight above the hook. To temporarily make it look all legal-like. As you can see from the photos, it comes close. But not quite.

…if this gear is on board a fishing vessel while inside the boundaries of the Pass, it cannot be attached to any rod, line or leader and must be stowed.

Once the device hits the water, the captain gives it a quick jerk, the hook breaks free, the rod and its now-bottom weighted and illegal “jig” are handed off to the unsuspecting client and they’re back to fishing and flossing like it’s 2013.

The regulations (and they’re regulations, not suggestions) adopted by the FWC are pretty specific. In the FWC’s words: “Fishing with gear that has a weight attached to a hook, artificial fly or lure in such a way that the weight hangs lower than the hook when the line or leader is suspended vertically from the rod is prohibited.”

Further, “if this gear is on board a fishing vessel while inside the boundaries of the Pass, it cannot be attached to any rod, line or leader and must be stowed.” Beyond not using these things, the FWC says you can’t even have them on you or on your rod or anywhere you might be able to get at them while afloat.

The FWC didn’t stop there. The FWC tossed in a little something these geniuses seemingly forgot. The folks at the FWC knew who they were dealing with. The FWC saw them coming when the new Boca Grande gear restrictions were drafted. The FWC anticipated the die-hards would attempt to find a way around the “suspended vertically” test. And, as we’re now seeing, the FWC was right.

While the FWC knew it WOULD happen, the FWC didn’t know exactly HOW it would happen. So the commissioners also adopted language designed to literally “cut them off at the Pass.” It reads: “Snagging, snatch hooking, spearing and the use of a multiple hook in conjunction with live or dead natural bait is prohibited.”

Simply put, snagging and snatch hooking is illegal. Attempting to snag and snatch hook tarpon is illegal. And because the rig in the photo is designed to do just that, you might want to take a close look at what’s on that rod before putting it in your hands. If it looks like the thing in the photo, don’t do it. Your friendly guide is setting you up. If he gets busted, you get to go along for the ride. Cute. And how much did you pay for that charter?

Welcome to Boca Grande. We’re the “Tarpon Fishing Capital of the World.” We want you to enjoy the time you spend with us, and take home some great memories. Getting rung up on a misdemeanor fish and wildlife charge shouldn’t be one of those memories, however. It’s not worth the risk.

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